Collecting Or Making Documents Likely To Facilitate Terrorist Acts

Collecting Or Making Documents Likely To Facilitate Terrorist Acts

In Victoria, Collecting or Making Documents Likely to Facilitate Terrorist Acts is found in section 101.5 of the Commonwealth Criminal Code 1995. It is a criminal offence that is committed by a person who was found to have gathered or created documents used for planning or doing a terrorist act.

Have you been accused of Collecting or Making Documents Likely to Facilitate Terrorist Acts? If yes, you should contact our firm immediately to speak with one of our experienced defence lawyers before you speak with the Police. This is a serious offence which will be investigated by the Police vigorously. You do not want to risk speaking to the Police without receiving some legal advice first.
 
Police Interview
If you are accused of Collecting or Making Documents Likely to Facilitate Terrorist Acts, it is important you speak to a lawyer as soon as possible. We can advise you on your rights in a Police Interview and ensure you are well informed of your options. Given the serious nature of this charge, it is likely that the first Court hearing would occur soon after you are charged. We can work quickly to prepare for this hearing, ensuring you have the best advice from the outset.

One of our dedicated defence lawyers can also attend the Police station with you to make sure your rights are protected. For a lot of people, they might not have had any previous interactions with Police and can find the interview process daunting. It can be re-assuring having some there who is on your side.

Pleading Not Guilty
We understand that just because you are accused of Collecting or Making Documents Likely to Facilitate Terrorist Acts, it does not mean it is true. We have lawyers who are experienced in defending charges of this kind. It is important that you engage lawyers who know how to properly examine a Police brief of evidence, and what to look for when preparing your defence. The Police may have misinterpreted certain situations, or they may have missed evidence that supports your innocence. We can work with you to conduct our own investigation.

Pleading Guilty
If you decide to plead guilty to Collecting or Making Documents Likely to Facilitate Terrorist Acts, there is significant work we undertake to achieve the best sentence possible. This may involve:

  • referrals to appropriate counselling,
  • relevant programs, and
  • an expert report.
We know how important it is to understand your background and personal circumstances, helping us to present your story to the Court.
This is a Commonwealth offence, meaning it will be heard in the Supreme Court.
 
  • You have work in a job that allows you access to private information regarding an iconic city building or space. You give that information to someone knowing their intention is to use it and cause harm or destruction.
  • You have work in a job that allows you access to private information regarding an iconic city building or space. A friend asks you for some information and although you think it is strange you pass on the information and a terrorist act occurs.
  • You create fake access passes to assist in a terrorist act.
What is the legal definition of Collecting Or Making Documents Likely To Facilitate Terrorist Acts?
In legal terms, Collecting or Making Documents Likely to Facilitate Terrorist Acts has 3 basic parts. They are:

  1. A person collects or makes a document; and
  2. The document is connected to planning or doing a terrorist act; and
  3. The person knew that there was a connection, or a likely connection, to a terrorist act.
“Have you been charged with collecting or making documents likely to facilitate terrorist acts?”
Legislation
The section that covers this offence is section 101.5 of the Commonwealth Criminal Code 1995:

  1. A person commits an offence if:
    1. the person collects or makes a document; and
    2. the document is connected with preparation for, the engagement of a person in, or assistance in a terrorist act; and
    3. the person mentioned in paragraph (a) knows of the connection described in paragraph (b).
    Penalty: Imprisonment for 15 years.
  2. A person commits an offence if:
    1. the person collects or makes a document; and
    2. the document is connected with preparation for, the engagement of a person in, or assistance in a terrorist act; and
    3. the person mentioned in paragraph (a) is reckless as to the existence of the connection described in paragraph (b).
    Penalty: Imprisonment for 10 years.
  3. A person commits an offence under subsection (1) or (2) even if:
    1. a terrorist act does not occur; or
    2. the document is not connected with preparation for, the engagement of a person in, or assistance in a specific terrorist act; or
    3. the document is connected with preparation for, the engagement of a person in, or assistance in more than one terrorist act.
  4. Section 15.4 (extended geographical jurisdiction—category D) applies to an offence against this section.
  5. Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply if the collection or making of the document was not intended to facilitate preparation for, the engagement of a person in, or assistance in a terrorist act.
    Note: A defendant bears an evidential burden in relation to the matter in subsection (5) (see subsection 13.3(3)).
  6. If, in a prosecution for an offence (the prosecuted offence) against a subsection of this section, the trier of fact is not satisfied that the defendant is guilty of the offence, but is satisfied beyond reasonable doubt that the defendant is guilty of an offence (the alternative offence) against another subsection of this section, the trier of fact may find the defendant not guilty of the prosecuted offence but guilty of the alternative offence, so long as the defendant has been accorded procedural fairness in relation to that finding of guilt.
Elements of the offence
The accused may be found guilty of this charge if the following elements are proven in court beyond reasonable doubt:

  • The accused collected or made a document; and
  • The document is connected with preparation for, the engagement of a person in, or assistance in a terrorist act; and
  • The accused knew of the connection, or was reckless as to the existence of the connection, of the document with a terrorist act.

  • There was no intention that the document helped prepare or do a terrorist act.
  • The person was not aware that the document had any connection to a terrorist act.
There are other possible defences, depending on the circumstances surrounding the alleged offending. Each matter is unique and requires an individual approach and strategy.

Questions in cases like this
  • In what way were the documents made or collected?
  • How were they connected to the terrorist act?
  • Was it a terrorist act?
  • What was your intention?

The maximum penalty for Collecting Or Making Documents Likely To Facilitate Terrorist Acts (s101.5 of the Commonwealth Criminal Code 1995) is 15 years imprisonment.

What can you be sentenced to for this charge?
Given the nature of the charge you would almost inevitably expect to get a gaol term for a charge like this.